EARLY LIFE NUTRITION NETWORK

Early Life Programming

Long Term Adverse Effects of Early Growth Acceleration or Catch-up Growth

It is generally accepted that preventing growth faltering in infants is clinically beneficial, however observational studies suggest that accelerated growth (upward centile crossing) is associated with long-term adverse

explore

Nutrition in infancy and long-term risk of obesity: Evidence from two randomized controlled trials

Two randomized controlled trials showed that children (5-8 years of age) assigned to receive a nutrient-enriched formula during infancy had 22-38% greater fat mass than those assigned to receive a standard formula. Inter

explore

Impact of ELN on Microbiota Development, Gut Health and Long Term Health

The intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of healthy immune responses. Delayed colonisation of the infant gut with commensal bacteria or alterations in the microbiota profile

explore

The Impact of ELN on Cognitive Development and Burden of Micro-Nutrients Deficiencies

The brain undergoes tremendous growth and specialization during early life and into young adulthood. A spurt in brain growth takes place from approximately the beginning of the third trimester of pregnancy until 2 years

explore

Impact of ELN on the Incidence of Non-Communicable Diseases

Programming, a term coined by Lucas in 1983, is the process whereby a stimulus at a critical period in development has a long term impact on the structure or function of the organism

explore

Early Life Nutrition Programming and Long Term Health Impact

The idea that nutrition may act during a critical window early in development to permanently affect, or ‘program’, long-term health first emerged from studies in animals but is now strongly supported in humans.

explore

Role of Nutrition in Brain and Visual Development

The LC-PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) occur in high levels in the brain and play a key role in the growth and function of the CNS. However, LC-PUFA synthesis in both the foetus and young

explore